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Swarm Capture Contact List for Middle Tennessee

If you find a swarm of honeybees on your property and would like them removed,

PLEASE DO NOT CALL AN EXTERMINATOR!

honeybee_swarmInstead, call one of the experienced beekeepers in the Wilson County Beekeepers Association. The women and men listed on our Swarm Capture List cover all communities in Wilson County and most of the surrounding counties too. They will carefully capture honeybees (without killing them) and remove them from your property, often at no expense to you. They want those honeybees. Please choose a beekeeper located close to the swarm as time is of the essence. Once they swarm to a tree or fence or some other structure, they will find a permanent home within hours and move in quickly so please don’t hesitate. Click here for the list:

Swarm Capture List for Middle Tennessee

 

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Swarm Capture Contact List for Middle Tennessee

If you find a swarm of honeybees on your property and would like them removed,

PLEASE DO NOT CALL AN EXTERMINATOR!

honeybee_swarmInstead, call one of the experienced beekeepers in the Wilson County Beekeepers Association. The women and men listed on our Swarm Capture List cover all communities in Wilson County and most of the surrounding counties too. They will carefully capture honeybees (without killing them) and remove them from your property often at no expense to you. They want those honeybees! Please choose a beekeeper located close to the swarm as time is of the essence. Once they swarm to a tree or fence or some other structure, they will find a permanent home within hours and move in quickly so please don’t hesitate. Click here for the list:

Swarm Capture List for Middle Tennessee

 

.
wcba

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This is at least bee related, every year Nikon sponsors what it calls ‘Small World Photomicrography’ contest.  The photos can be viewed at:

nikonsmallworld.com/galleries/photo/2015-photomicrography-competition

This year’s winter is “honey bee eye with dandelion pollen grains, 120x”.  The following goes with the photo, as reported in Microscopy and Microanalysis, Issue 140, November/December 2015:

A reflected light microscopy image of a honey bee eye covered in dandelion pollen grains has won the 2015 Nikon Small World Photomicrography Contest.

Judges were particularly impressed with how Ralph Grimm had captured this image stack, which included more than four hours of careful work to mount the eye, set the focus increments, illuminate the subject and avoid peripheral smudging during the stacking process.

Grimm, a high school teacher and former beekeeper based in Queensland Australia, hopes his image will raise the profile of this endangered species that plays a critical function in pollinating the world’s crops.

If you want to go directly to that image and not bother with the other photos use the link below.   But they are worth a look!!

nikonsmallworld.com/galleries/entry/2015-photomicrography-competition/1

Russ Davis
Merry Christmas and Happy New Year!
(8-})

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Happy Thanksgiving 15
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bee feeding larvaFour pesticides commonly used on crops to kill insects and fungi also kill honeybee larvae within their hives, according to new research. Scientists also found that N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone — an inert, or inactive, chemical commonly used as a pesticide additive — is highly toxic to honeybee larvae.

“We found that four of the pesticides most commonly found in beehives kill bee larvae,” said Jim Frazier, professor of entomology, Penn State. “We also found that the negative effects of these pesticides are sometimes greater when the pesticides occur in combinations within the hive. Since pesticide safety is judged almost entirely on adult honeybee sensitivity to individual pesticides and also does not consider mixtures of pesticides, the risk assessment process that the Environmental Protection Agency uses should be changed.”

According to Frazier, the team’s previous research demonstrated that forager bees bring back to the hive an average of six different pesticides on the pollen they collect. Nurse bees use this pollen to make beebread, which they then feed to honeybee larvae.

To examine the effects of four common pesticides — fluvalinate, coumaphos, chlorothalonil and chlorpyrifos — on bee larvae, the researchers reared honeybee larvae in their laboratory. They then applied the pesticides alone and in all combinations to the beebread to determine whether these insecticides and fungicides act alone or in concert to create a toxic environment for honeybee growth and development. [ … continue reading ]

Source: http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/01/140127122825.htm

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Jan. 18, 2014 — Gender differences in nature are common, including in humans. A research team from Bern, Switzerland has found that male European honey bees, or drones, are much more susceptible than female European honey bees, known as workers, to a fungal intestinal parasite called Nosema ceranae. Originally from Asia, Nosema ceranae has rapidly spread throughout the world in recent years, and may contribute to the high number of colony deaths now observed in many regions of the northern hemisphere. These findings demonstrate the delicate nature of male honey bees, which are important to honey bee colony reproduction, to a well-distributed parasite. [ … continue reading ]

Source: http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/01/140118122503.htm

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EPA Sued Over Bees

By Julian Hattem, December 09, 2013

bees_120913thinkstock

Beekeepers are suing the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) over its approval of a chemical they say kills honey producers.

The pesticide sulfoxaflor is “highly toxic” to bees and other insects, the groups say, and could be contributing to broader declines of bee populations around the world.

“This case is really quite simple: bees are getting wiped out, and yet the EPA rubber stamped another bee-killing pesticide,” said Earthjustice attorney Greg Loarie in a statement on Friday. “EPA failed the beekeeping industry and all of us who rely on a sustainable food supply by refusing to consider threats to pollinators from this new pesticide.”

Bees are necessary to pollinate a range of agricultural crops, and benefit as much as one-third of all food and beverages.

Since 2006, scientists have worried about a sharp decline in bee populations, known as colony collapse disorder, which some have blamed on pesticides.

The Pollinator Stewardship Council, the National Honey Bee Advisory Board, American Honey Producers Association, the American Beekeeping Federation and individual beekeepers are suing the EPA to get it to withdraw its approval of the Dow Chemical pesticide. The groups are being represented by EarthJustice.

They say that the agency ignored concerns about Dow’s field tests and needs to issue stronger labeling requirements to limit the hazard the substance poses to bees.

Sulfoxaflor is in a class of pesticides known as neonicotinoid. This month, a European Union ban of three different neonicotinoids went into effect, which policy makers there said was necessary to protect bees. The suspension will last for two years.

The EPA has declined to take similar steps to restrict the sales of the pesticides.

In August, however, the agency released new labels for pesticides containing neonicotinoids warning that they can “kill bees and other insect pollinators.”

Source: http://thehill.com/blogs/regwatch/court-battles/192523-epa-sued-over-bees

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